Framboise Mangue: a manifesto for the liberation of the taste buds

Framboise Mangue: a manifesto for the liberation of the taste buds
2 July 2020 Framboise Mangue

Dear raspberry bushes, dear mango trees,

Notice to all taste buds in the French-speaking world and beyond: liberation has arrived! They wanted to make us believe that French cuisine was beef bourguignon, crème brûlée followed by a little coffee? Wrong, it’s much more than that! A new kind of chef is planning to give back its place to mixed cuisine. Moïse proudly boasts of the richness of French cuisine and intends to shake the coconut tree from the tradition heavy with wine sauces and charcuteries.

Let us tell you a story…

Once upon a time there was French cuisine, first of all from Roman specialities (blood sausage, pâtés, ham in a crust…) and Gallic specialities (meats, cheeses…). In the Middle Ages, vegetables and meat were eaten on a slice of bread (the slicer), but from the time of the Great Discoveries (15th to 17th century) our gastronomy was enriched with exotic ingredients from the East such as chocolate, potatoes, apricots, oranges and lemons. The Renaissance brought to France the American bean, the North African artichoke, the tomato and pineapple from Central America or the pea from Holland. In the 19th century, the railroad still revolutionizes the exchanges and we discover the banana, then in the 20th century the kiwi or the avocado. Our crossbreeding does not stop there…

French gastronomy is resolutely the fruit of a crossbreeding of cultures.

With the spice route and the 16th century counters, French palaces have already opened up to the scents of pepper, vanilla, cinnamon, ginger, saffron and turmeric. But immigration and colonization still considerably enrich the range of dishes in French gastronomy.

The “French” culinary identity is made up of all those of the countries and continents with which the hexagon has been in contact, as well as the contribution of all the populations of the world present on the territory. The overseas territories, the DROMs, alone bring a whole constellation of exotic dishes, flavours and ingredients to our tables.

Caribbean, Africa, Asia… The marriage of all these cultures makes up today’s France and raises our cuisine to a higher level, healthy, universal, with subtle balances, an explosion of flavours, colours and happiness!

A few examples of the richness of mixed foods with this little guessing game…

I’m a root from South America. Today I am blossoming in Africa. The way I prepare myself is similar to that of the potato as well as my taste, enhanced by a chestnut scent. My starch is called “tapioca”. I am… cassava!

Made from a plant, I am a fruit eaten as a vegetable, rich in starch, minerals and vitamins A and C. I have a “sweet and wild” taste. You have to cook me to eat me. I contain more potassium than the banana. I am… the plantain banana!

I am a generous fruit with a creamy orange flesh and fragrant. Originally from Africa, I am now cultivated in all tropical countries. Delicious on its own, I achieve a perfect balance in duo with a dairy product, but my use is not limited to desserts, I also get along very well with meat and fish. I am… the mango!

I have been grown for 4,000 years. I grow with my feet in the water. I’m a vegetable, although I also have a tuber. I’m particularly appreciated in Asia and Africa. No, I am not rice, I am much more nutritious, rich in iron and calcium! I am the tarot leaf (or “kale”)!

For a blossoming of French cuisine in all its diversity

Exoticism is not new in our kitchen, and France goes far beyond its French border. It was about time a chef reflected this richness! Let’s free the taste buds! Welcome to the world of Framboise Mangue, where traditional cuisine is combined with contemporary cuisine from the diversity of the French, a cuisine that reveals the treasure that is crossbreeding. We will do everything to make your trip unforgettable, especially since it will take place… at home!

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